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Blogwatch

November 3, 2008
World bloggers consider race in U.S. election

A Barack Obama banner by Brazilian blogger “Gordo Nerd.”

Racial issues came to the forefront in the recent U.S. presidential election, in which Barack Obama was elected the nation’s first African-American president.

Some thought that President-elect Obama would suffer from the “Bradley Effect” — referencing when African-American candidate Tom Bradley lost his bid for governor of California in 1982 despite polls showing him ahead.

In the end, exit polls showed that Obama garnered 44 percent of the white vote, more than John KerryAl Gore or Bill Clinton.

Though race was not part of Obama’s campaign strategy, bloggers worldwide nonetheless seized on the issue.

Jamaican blogger “b C” of “Stories of Me” says that many Jamaicans support Barack Obama simply because he’s a black man.

Brazilian bloggers posted a banner with the words “Não vote em branco” — a phrase which carries the double meaning of  “don’t cast a blank vote” and “don’t vote for a white person.” Worldfocus previously reported on Brazilian candidates who changed their names to “Barack Obama”.

Paula Góes of Global Voices Online’s “Voices without Votes” discusses the response of Brazilian bloggers to the race issue in this election.

Enrique Gonzales of “The Latino Contrarian” blog thinks Obama is the first Latino president in the same way that Bill Clinton was the “first black president.”

Jordanian blogger Naseem Tarawnah of “The Black Iris” says that the next U.S. president is unlikely to “change” much and attributes Obama’s prophet-like status to U.S. election culture. Tarawnah discusses the Bradley Effect and argues that race played an important role in the election.

The “Armenian Economist” blog writes that Armenians see the “Bradley Effect” quite differently — because Tom Bradley lost the race to George Deukmejian,  an Armenian American.

The New York Post reports that Obama’s racial and cultural background generate support from Arabs. Columnist Mohamed al-Menshawi calls the Christian Obama “the harbinger of solidarity between Americans and the Muslim world.”

An article at Japanese news site “Asahi” looks at the Japanese view of race in the election.

The “Grave Error” blog discusses European disbelief that Americans could elect an African American as well as lingering Spanish racism.

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Comments

5 comments

#5

It is one thing to acheive equality between individuals in a common society, but quite another to conceed equality at the expense of the common good in respect to lowering standard test scores to enable blacks to keep up ,but redard whites from their potentials,all people are not equal in terms of mentality, society is affording an artifical acceptance between races in an effort to communize people to a mongruel race form that combine animal to human results,

#4

I had three children born in American, I love this country and I know that God love this country, that’s why, he gave America, president Obama.America was bless and he will get more blessing with this changes.

Africa need somebody like president Obama, to say “Yes We Can”. He loves his country, may God help him to do good job on the right time, amen,may Almighty God bless America, because America is like a human head, when you have a head pain, your body will feel it, so, when there is any problem in American, the World feel it, specially, Africa. May Almighty God guide our President on the right path, like he’s doing now, may congress and our new leaders be on the same page, so that, their work can be done on time, and we can prepare our children futur by attending college. Thank you and may Almighty God bless America.

#3

I was chosen to get the message to the world through B. Obama. Most of My visions and his visions are solved. Just Have us meet face to face. Anyone Please!!! Have us meet now! ASAP. He Took ten minutes out to play basketball to get elected. Please! Contact me. Get us together now. I spent the night in Trinitas because police thought I was crazy. Just 1 minute and the world will start to smile. I promise.

#2

I, too, voted for Obama. Color had nothing to do w/my vote. His message had all to do w/it. I, am, way beyond color. My children are way beyond it too! We are proud American’s. We stand by our vote and hope that patience will prevail the demands that the Republican’s are already placing on him by trying to rush him into making decisions. Obama asked that we be patient and we most certainly intend to. The other party will try to convince the world that he hasn’t kept his promises. It’s hard to keep promises when the other party practically bankrupt our economy!

#1

I am proud to have voted for President-ellect Obama, and i assume that most Americans are also .we are not in a post-racial mode as many people have to be educated ,institutionaldized racism has to be eliminated and who knows how long it will take to eliminate it. I wish the president-elect the best ,and hope all people of good will will support him as he has many issues to resolve and much is espected of him .I can only pray for cooperation of both parties in congress that they will come together for the common good. God bless and guide them,God bless America.

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