This website is no longer actively maintained
Some material and features may be unavailable
In the Newsroom

October 31, 2008
Keep the comments coming…we’re listening

Worldfocus anchor Martin Savidge addresses some of the comments we’ve received about the show. Have a question or comment that he hasn’t addressed? Post it here.

We hear you.

We’ve been on the air now four weeks, so I thought it was time I addressed the comments we’ve received from our viewers.

From the complaint department…

Number one by far was our bump music. That’s the music and graphic that come up between segments. Many of you wrote to say how aggravating and just plain annoying it was. Well, as of last Tuesday, it was replaced. I have to say it made a huge improvement — thanks.

Another major aggravator…our continuous use of the word “partners.” This really does apparently get a lot of people’s goats.

Richard the retiree wrote:

Is it necessary to always refer to the guest reporters as “our partner?” It’s very repetitive. Maybe just say “from.”

BCH put it more poetically:

I know “Our partner Deutsche Welle” better than I do the pledge of allegiance.

BCH and Richard, take heart — as of this week, the word “partner” is gone from our lexicon!

Ginny from Oregon wrote to say:

Thanks for the fine news program – at last. [But] the audio is bad: Words clipped fairly often, maybe every 30 – 60 seconds…

We checked, and as the engineers are fond of saying, “The audio’s fine leaving here.” Maybe we can have a word with your local PBS affiliate in Portland.

Patrick in Georgia noted his own audio issue. He said Worldfocus was growing on him,

“HOWEVER it drives me crazy to watch it. Why? Because Martin Savidge’s lips are not synced up with his voice.”

Patrick, I did my own test of this by talking in front of the mirror. Words and mouth moved in perfect unison. So again, “It’s fine leaving here.” We’ll talk to your affiliate.

Ruth wrote us about our interview over the call for early elections in Israel:

The little time you allowed this guest to ‘discuss’ was an embarrassment, particularly in light of the amount of time spent on Singapore’s traffic control. Really, where are your values/priorities?

Ruth, there will always be disagreement about the length of time given to any one subject. We debate (argue) that amongst ourselves daily.

The Singapore traffic story was part of our Blueprint America coverage, which is a network-wide effort to highlight ideas that could help issues of America’s infrastructure. Truth is, we will be doing many stories and interviews on the Israeli election. That’s probably the first and last time you will see a report on Singapore traffic.

Lastly, a number of emails were from people not too thrilled with me.

Virilene said Worldfocus had the look, feel and urgency of an infomercial:

Mr. Savidge is probably a nice man, but he presents as an android.

(Ouch!)

BCH referred to “The slow pace and M.S.’s languid delivery” and said our news quiz was apparently aimed at high-schoolers.

I can only say, BCH, you must be one smart person — because most of the Worldfocus staff took that quiz and I have yet to find a person who passed. And just about all of those working here hold master’s degrees.

The put-down with the most panache came from David in Denver:

Martin Savidge, who reminds me a lot of Chris Bury, who reminds me a lot of Arthur Godfrey, is a ‘bon general ordinaire’ but not a ‘grand chef.’ (quoting deGaulle)

I’m afraid you’re stuck with me for a while. I will say I came to Worldfocus not so much for my hosting skills, but because I have been in just about all the places we report on. In fact, there is hardly anyone sitting in any anchor chair who has logged as much continuous time in the field as a reporter as I have.

Like everything else associated with Worldfocus, if it ever comes down to choosing between style or substance…substance will always win.

Maybe I’ll grow on you.

Keep the comments coming…we’re listening.

– Martin Savidge

bookmark    print

Comments

13 comments

#13

Martin Savidge is one of the best interviewers I have ever seen. He is a natural. His wholesome appearance immediately attracts viewers, and he is a skillful interviewer. His questions are few and pertinent and he is a superb listener. Very likeable person,indeed.!

#12

5/29/09 I should also add that The shows host M. Savidge is providing ever timely informative global coverage. Thanks for the stirring breadth of coverage!

#11

5/29/09

C/O Michael Savidge

Weapons as viral epidemics still proliferate and mutate with no sure lasting antidotes, yet strangely, there’s even yet a dis-inclination to report on the the numerous incidences where danger mitigating incidents have spared lives and property without weaponry and drugs but rather through interpositioning of phenomenally characterized unconventional highly advanced nuances, which have -whenever enacted- always effected almost immediate reductions of dangers apart from mechanical usages, massive monetary expeditures and even governmental and public consensus.

No costly consumptions of fuel or chemical additives were employed either yet results were widely apparent.

At a time when danger mitigating services are rendered at high costs and with often partial results and where ‘insurances’ do not prevent their occurrences, it seems such more advanced services with minimal costs demands would be welcomed by peoples everywhere. Could it be that because they do not require lavish monetary expenditures they have not been popularized?

Around the world the season of cyclones have begun, as in the west the season is about to begin their usual devastating course now exasperated by reckless human policies and practices. We have seen the limits of money -what it can and cannot do-. Isn’t it time to reach for what is yet more efficacious? The future has arrived! Why remain mired in the past?!

#10

I would so urgently like to know if any plastic surgeon or organization responded to your coverage of the little blind and disfigured Iraqi girl on your December 11th show? Is there any follow-up or group willing to oversee her care? I would like to reach out and do something for her although other than a modest donation, I do not know what I can do but if there is anyone else out there who also wants to help or anyone else I can contact, would you kindly let me know? Thank you. CC

#9

Martin Savidge need not be any better than he already is. Any supposed presentation points are only bothersome to those who are bothered by them…if, indeed, the points are able to be considered flaws, in actuality. The presentations are smooth, informative, unique, world-focused, and interestingly compelling. All this must remain only an opinion but I hope some will read this opinion and realize the truth of the matter: Martin cannot be topped. He remains the best or among the best in the business. Can anyone really disagree…and still be considered sane?

#8

Congratulations on a superb program and by far the Best International News Program I have yet seen. Mr. Savidge is a pleasure and reminds me of what excellent journalism is all about.
Keep up the good work and Thank You!
Best Regards, Stephen Fisher

#7

Sorry about my spelling

#6

Feel may pain, so many crying about getting poor, so big deal, feel my pain, I have always lived in poverty, I’m lucky it was here in America though. Where is all the money going ? unimaginable amounts of money in Corporate hands of so few that the poor will never see. Has Government has lost all control over all the nonliving corporate entities, making life so very bad for communities, states, this country and the World, Why is their no control of a Corporate world run amuck ? I’ve been called a kook, asking for financing to develop fish friendly Water Wheel electric generation technology, you know I’m poor, but I’m not the one running this failing economy, maybe I’m just running a failing Spiritual world, you know, Who know’s

#5

I concur with Angie. It is nice to know that when a news program uses “world” in its title, it means it.

With regards to substance over style, we seem to have gotten used to the fast pace and slick words of the “big three” networks and their cable competitors. We should take the examples of news programs like the BBC in knowing that the news is just that, a balanced, unbiased, no-nonsense approach to providing information about an ever-changing world.

#4

I am so enthused that I actually can see a news program that focuses on different world events. To show how isolationist our country has gotten. World news on the Prime time broadcast channels just focuses on the fifty states and then when they do concentrate on another country it is almost always some silly or funny fluff piece. I hope your show is a main stay on public television.

#3

oct 31st edition.
one economist’s presription for the financial crisis: people have to start spending.
Immediately after, another economist’s explanation for the crisis: people are overspent, in debt.
Wouldn’t it seem appropriate, in a intelligent program, to note and maybe explore this impossible double bind?
jfv

#2

I agree with Martin Savidge. Substance or style….I choose substance any day!!
Keep up the great work at Worldfocus, I’m getting tired of only having BBC as a good source for the world view of events. It’s really refreshing to see an American news program that gives a neutral unbiased view.
I do agree though, when I first viewed Worldfocus I thought it was an infomercial of sorts. However that feeling quickly went away because of the good substance of the news….

#1

The lite headline puns are killing me. Especially at the beginning (teaser) and end of the show, on the ‘lighter’ stories. KILLING me. they’re painful, cringeworthy and seemingly don’t belong in a ‘real’ newcast.

also sometimes the writers are too busy working in a pun than explaining clearly what the story is about, in one line.

Produced by Creative News Group LLC     ©2019 WNET.ORG     All rights reserved

Distributed by American Public Television