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March 4, 2010
McDonald’s celebrates 20 tasty years in Moscow

McDonald’s recently celebrated its 20th anniversary in Russia.

Back in 1990, when fast food arrived in Moscow, Russians considered the items to be delicacies. Today, Russia boasts the busiest McDonald’s in the world.

Oksana Boyko of Russia Today reports on how McDonald’s offered more than just fast food — it represented Western values.

Watch a 2003 commerical for McDonald’s – the Russian version of “I’m Loving It.”

The Private Sector Development Blog, which is maintained by the World Bank Group’s Rapid Response knowledge service, noted another important aspect of the anniversary.

McDonald’s is celebrating its 20th anniversary in Russia this week. One of the most interesting aspects of McDonald’s’ Russian adventure is the evolution of its supply chain, which has developed remarkably in the past 20 years. Today, McDonald’s sources all of its ingredients from outside purveyors, an 180 degree shift from when the company opened its first outlet in 1990:

The company celebrated a different milestone earlier this year by outsourcing the last product — hamburger buns — it had made at a proprietary factory outside Moscow called McComplex. It was built before the chain opened its first restaurant. Nearly everywhere else, McDonald’s buys ingredients, rather than making its own. But in the Soviet Union, there simply were no private businesses to supply the 300 or so distinct ingredients needed by a McDonald’s outlet.

Everything — from frozen French fries to pie filling — had to be made from scratch at a sprawling factory.

In the 20 years since McDonald’s arrived in Russia, enough private enterprises have sprung up to supply nearly every ingredient needed to operate one of its restaurants.

Today, private businesses in Russia supply 80 percent of the ingredients in a McDonald’s, a reversal from the ratio when it opened in 1990 and 80 percent of ingredients were imported.

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1 comment

#1

They may have accept Mac Donalds in Moscow, but they aren’t accepting Christianity where the JW’s
are being perscuted again as they were under the commies. see http://www.jw-media.org

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