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February 24, 2010
Relocated Nukak Indians face extinction in Colombia

The Nukak, an indigenous Colombian people living on the edge of the Amazon basin, only had their first official contact with the outside world in 1988. In the following two decades, the Nukak have seen their numbers drop by more than half due to the introduction of new diseases and displacement.

The Nukak have been forced to abandon their traditional nomadic existence in the tropical jungle because of the conflict between the Colombian army and the rebel FARC movement, and now face the possibility of the complete extinction of their culture.

Our partner Al Jazeera English reports on the story from Colombia.

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Comments

5 comments

#5

The word “Indian” is used in error. Up to one day before Columbus landed on the American Continent, there was not one “Indian” on this continent. Just because Columbus was lost and wouldn’t ask directions, what’s our excuse is the 21st Century? Give India back their rightful name.

#4

Our lives prescience is touched only by historicity knowing the abandonment of past ancestry,…the direct lineage from the very soul of mother earth’s primordial seeding,…a recent phenomenal bonding that is nothing-less than truculent euthanasia! Although life’s reality progressively dictate the cruel wayward path for survival,…modern societies have evolved,and come too realize the essence of singularity as what metastasises society plurality’s. How dare a modern culture abort it’s birthing ritualistic rights? The very foundation of our existence must never be forsakened with little more than a wink of an eye into the abstract,and deep halo-shadow’s arrogantly placated by vanity,and fainted-mirrors, illuminating the light of progress! Yes,…the modern world in all its glory reels with laughter at the non-materialistic aborigine as they hug mother earth’s dirt bounty,selfishly cherishing all their earthly treasures,…the sky above,and the mud below, needs be satified. These few but bountiful self-sufficient caretakers of God’s creations sing with eternal reverence to the windblown treetops painting the morning,and evening sky,a misty seaspray,…a melancholy raison d’etre. Thanks again, Worldfocus

#3

Correction: Once the wisdom of primal people is gone, we’ll never get it back. It’s really extinct already.

#2

Once the wisdom of primal is gone, we’ll never get it back. It’s really extinct already.

#1

Now there are indigenous cultures like these, small groups, who live in harmony with nature. We as the “cultivated world” don’t even allow them to take the little they need to survive. And at the same time we keep on going with our lifestyle of exploiting our earth … How unjust!

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