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February 12, 2010
Mexican president tries to save country’s murder capital

Our broadcast this evening starts in Ciudad Juarez, one of the most dangerous places in the world just a couple miles across the U.S. border from Texas.

The drug war there kills an average of 8 people per day and has residents living in fear.

Thursday night, Mexican President Felipe Calderon was in the city, hearing criticism that the government was not doing enough to quell the violence.

Mariana Sanchez of Al Jazeera English reports from Mexico’s murder capital.

Can Ciudad Juarez be saved from the drug violence?

Tell us what you think in the comments section below. Please be respectful and on-point. Malicious or offensive comments will be deleted, and repeat offenders will be banned.

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23 comments

#23

[…] a recent rise in drug violence along the Mexican border, many critics of the drug war have called for a change in U.S. policy toward marijuana […]

#22

“Mexican president tries to save country’s murder capital”—- lets hope he doesn’t succeed

#21

Do three things:
1. Legalize medical use of marijuana.
2. Close gun sale loopholes to prevent gun traffic to Mexico.
3. Conduct a massive education program illustrating that the use of drugs destroys persons and families and results in hundreds of innocent deaths in drug wars.

#20

It would help if more was done in the U.S.A. to concentrate on helping to curb the demand for drugs in that country!

#19

Reduction of drug-related violence in Ciudad Juarez and other cities, including those in the US, requires a drastic reduction in the consumption of drugs and this would strangle the demand for it. As a business, it is too lucrative to ignore. The promise of large sums of money for people who are barely surviving in their towns and villages in Mexico and other neighboring countries is extremely enticing. For many, it’s worth risking their lives to be “mules” or defend “middle-men” and the trade. The options of controlling and/or reducing consumption/demand are not many. One can argue for an open-gate policy which may lead to a flood of drugs on the market. However, the initial negative health and economic impacts on families and the US economy may be unbearable. A more potent solution would be to legalize the use of marijuana with limitations on amount an individual could have in his possession, and locations where it would be available. An increase in its use legally, may shift demand from Colombia’s “powder-gold” to marijuana. A reduction in demand for cocaine would ultimately reduce the profitability, and hence the need for guns to defend the drug trade would decline.

#18

Moscow once had a death rate of 5,000 per year, most were shootings by firearms that are illegal to have. The Russian government crack down by deporting those caught with an firearm to a dark cold place. Never to be seen again. Mexico should do the same thing if you have an illegal weapon it is an hanging, if you have a lwayer it is a double hanging.
For rape turn those men into Eunuchs.

#17

If the US were to set up a program whereby the bulk of Mexican Marijuana was bought by the US Government, then, the criminal motive of the gangs would be abolished. The dollars are already leaving the US economy to fund the drug trade. Also, the dollars spent to enforce out-dated laws could be redirected towards possible causes. Sound far fetched ? Making it legal and having the government sell it may be the only way. In California, anyone who has $200.00 can get a prescription and grow six
plants. Six plants yields up-to 24 pounds of high grade Marijuana.

#16

sorry to say but we need a Berlin Wall at the border of Mexico.

#15

To answer the question, yes. To commenton the broadcast: I was saddened to see that World Focus has fallen for the US Media spin re: weapons trafficing. The weapons I’ve seen on the US news programs include select fire M4 carbines, M16 rifles, RPGs, full auto M60 mahine guns and the ever demonized AK47. These weapons are not easily obtainable in the US. Whether from a leagal gun dealer or legal “gun show”, these weapons are not readily available.
As mentioned above, when large amounts of money is at stake, corruption abounds. I would suggest comparing the serial numbers with the “captured” weapons with those issued to the local and federal police and army in Juarez…

#14

Of course it can-impose a curfew and shoot anybody that breaks it-use our troops from the useless war in Afghanistan………

#13

There is no turning back. The people in the city of Juarez deserve to have control of their city, I was fortunate to have visited the city of Juarez numerous times in the 70’s, and they were very friendly toward tourist, and respectful of other cultures. VIVA the people of JUAREZ !!

#12

Any time you have people making large amounts of money you will have corruption and violance.

#11

I live across the border of juarez, all I can say that can be easily said than done is to form an allience with the U.S government to create special organizations to stop the root of the problem which is the supplier at hand. Also the distribution at arms is the most essential part of the war, The mexican drug cartels use youths with no hopes for a future in order to subdue them in a childlike state to assure them of wealth and assurance. Plain and simple, the U.S has the advanced technology to stop them, since border patrols are constantly seizing drugs on the border, what has mexico done besides let innocent civilians die at the hands of drug cartels???

#10

The U.S. should play a large roll in our relation with Mexico. Mexico and not Israel should be our main priority with foreign aid, trade,immigration and diplomacy. With our determination we can help clean up the corruption and help raise the standard of living thereby creating a safe and controlable border.

#9

It is a complex problem and no one solution, but I believe an important part is: since the passing of NAFTA, Mexicans have not been able to compete with U.S. subsidized commodities. Many young people have left their rural homes and agrarian society to live in the city. With no jobs in the city or very low paying jobs there, they turn to selling drugs. Treaties such as NAFTA need to be made to improve the life of the people and not to only to increase profits for corporations. The same applies to immigration of Central Americans to the U.S.

#8

It really is time for consideration of legalization of these drugs that are involved in the trade and drug war.

#7

Short of U.S. legalization of not only marijuana but opiates — not likely — the solution can only be holistic, i.e. reforms and improvements on all fronts, including education, jobs, health and sanitation, municipal services. But public safety is surely job one. That means the Mexican-U.S. border has to become a corruption-free, safe, prosperous civil society that respects the rule of law. The Mexican government, by involving the army, has only committed a single tentative step in this direction. A much more extensive national effort with widespread international support is necessary.

#6

The way to curb the drug violence in Juarez is the same way the Federal Government curbed the drug violence in Chicago in 1933, end prohibition. The United States government should legalize marijuana, which is the number one drug crop of Mexico, and both the Mexican and American governments could tax the crop. The drug cartels can then become legitimate businesses that have to pay taxes. It worked in the 30s, it can work now in this new century.

#5

The problem is the US drug market, which the government can not control. Without the market, the drug trafficking will die. Castro solved Cuba’s drug problem overnight when he came to power by executing the pushers, and five years hard labor for the users. Without a realistic hard line approach like this, anything said or done in reality is just lip service.

#4

If Mexico is to win the war in Jaurez it must declare martial law, bring in an addition 15,000 to 20,000 troops, seal off the city with well enforced check points, and round up the criminals and their police advocates. The criminal gangs and the corrupt police forces should receive the same fate, arrest and prosecution. Too many young women have been raped and killed in Jaurez for anyone who is innocent to be left on any police force in the city. This is not about drugs, its about survival for the million citizens of jaurez, Its time to bring the drug war to a swift end— on your knees should be the last word the criminals every here !

#3

Absolutely…. everyone in the area knows where the drug lords live. In the middle of the night, drop a tomahawk missile down the chimney of each drug lord and the message will be clear…….. if you want to be a drug lord, this will be your fate.

#2

When are nations going to learn that this “drug war” cannot be won; that they are going against human nature !
Smuggling is the oldest trade known to man and the only way to oliviate this is to make drugs legal ! It takes away the black-market, and thusly, adults can make their own decision whether to take drugs, like they do when it comes to consuming alchohol !
This archaic thinking process that allows nations to waste valuable assets in combating something that should be legalized and taxed, will allow them to “win the war”…..

#1

The only way Juarez or any part of mexico can be led is if the army is dedicated and not corrupt. It must be the President to lead the way.

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