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February 4, 2010
On World Cancer Day, fighting back against cigarette use

Today is World Cancer Day, a global initiative to combat one of the leading causes of death across the globe.

The World Health Organization estimates that 84 million people will die from the disease between 2005 and 2015, and the campaign against cigarette smoking is a crucial part of the fight against cancer.

Daljit Dhaliwal speaks to Dr. Neil Schluger, Chief Scientific Officer of World Lung Foundation for more about tobacco use among the estimated 1.1 billion smokers in the world. He points out that getting rid of cigarettes would increase the health of the planet more than curing tuberculosis, AIDS, or malaria.

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Comments

7 comments

#7

Funny, in all her interviews, Daljit generally asks hard questions and refuses to take the interviewee’s views at face value. Here she doesn’t pose a single challenging or interesting questions, such as “what should the limits of tobacco control policy be?”, or “wait a minute — how could tobacco use cost governments as much as you say? Don’t smokers, if they become ill, only do so late in life? Don’t they collect less pensions and not live as long? Are you counting the cost of treating healthy people longer as they live to be older?” At least give us something interesting, Daljit!

#6

The war on cancer is a myth. Decades of research and billions and untold billions of dollars later and there is no cure? Is there really not a cure for cancer ? When was the last time an American president died of cancer ?
If they were to release the cure too many people would live too long and place an excessive demand on the system. And that is there very reason smoking will not be banned,because, it is the policy of government reduce the long term costs associated with living, and death reduces costs. Betulinic acid and Melanoma google it

#5

In some Third World countries tobacco companies advertize the ‘healthful effects’ of tobacco use. Some of these ads are made by American and British tobacco companies. It is criminal behaviour.

#4

Everyone has a right to breathe clean air. This mean it’s free from cancer causing pollutants such as cigarette smoke, wood burning, and car exhaust. The government needs to go further and take action against people who drive cars and people who have fireplaces. They are polluting the air and causing cancer.

#3

This planet has an overpopulation explosion,and this activist is only concerned about smoking….this topic is about number 500000 in line of important issues!

#2

Your report about smoking, and your anti-smoking expert, take the perspective that we need to stop people form freely choosing to smoke. I find this kind of interventionist, big-government, liberal agenda to be insulting. National and international governments and organizations have no right telling people what they can and can’t do. This attitude that people are too stupid to make decisions for themselves, and that governments know better is laughable. If 20% of Americans and millions of others around the world enjoy tobacco, they should not be targeted as second-class citizens, or have this valuable and important agricultural product taxed disproportionately. We need a global fight against poverty and hunger, not smoking. We need to stop attempting to limit the free use of tobacco and other plants placed on this Earth by it’s Creator.

#1

Bravo. We’ve taken some good steps here in the U.S. but abroad the tobacco industry is still marketing to children and using other shameful tactics that would be illegal in many countries. We need a global fight against tobacco.

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