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November 16, 2009
Everyday Danes profit from pioneering wind power

Watch all the videos from Worldfocus’ signature series: Green Energy in Denmark.

Long ago, Denmark pioneered wind power, which now accounts for 20 percent of its energy production. Everyday Danish citizens — from farmers to art dealers — invested in windmills. Worldfocus special correspondent John Larson reports on how Danish citizens are capturing windfall profits.

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12 comments

#12

Terrific segment. I wish I could get my neighborhood interested in a co-op windmill. Everyone in the US should see this report. What better way to reduce our need for oil, and not involve the corporate world.

#11

The Japanese have a turbine which has a magnet that keeps birds from the turbine area as they use the earth’s gravity to guide their flights.

#10

This is a good example of community cooperation. Projects like this need not be multi-state,or single county size.

#9

[…] Long ago, Denmark pioneered wind power, which now accounts for 20 percent of its energy production. Everyday Danish citizens — from farmers to art dealers — invested in wind and accrued windfall profits. Worldfocus special correspondent John Larson reports on how Danish citizens are capturing windfall profits. Read more at http://worldfocus.org/blog/2009/11/16/everyday-danes-profit-from-pioneering-wind-power/8431/ […]

#8

I would like to be able to watch this segment again. I am curious about whether this is feasible and would offer the same payback period in the US.

#7

High energy taxes had a great deal to do with encouraging the Danes to adopt wind power. Also, being a small country makes it realtively inexpensive to transport that wind energy to the consumers unlike in the huge distances of the U.S. where $billions will be needed to construct transmission lines from wind mills to consumers.

#6

For every 10,000 birds killed by human activities, less than 1 death is caused by a wind turbine. (5500 buildings/windows, 1000 house cats, 1000 other, 800 high tension lines, 700 vehicles, 700 pesticides, 250 communication towers, <1 wind turbines)

source: http://www.awea.org/pubs/factsheets/050629_Myths_vs_Facts_Fact_Sheet.pdf

#5

Warlike Danes traded their Viking heritage for wind power. They set up a kibbutz on northern shores to work together for common good. What not to like? Looks great all around.

#4

John,
Wind mills have long been a part of Danish history. My Great,Great,Great,Great Grandfather Soren Peter Jespersen was a mill builder in Mullerup, Denmark whos mills were still standing in the late ’60’s when I was there. His signature was a distinctive finial at the top of the mill. Then, of course, they were built to grind grain. Interesting story. Wish our family was still in the business!

#3

Practical experience here in Denmark is that the windmills have very little if any impact on bird populations. Of course you will not put up wind mills in the middle of a wild life sanctuary

#2

World Focus, thanks so much for bringing to our attention strides in clean renewable energy abroad that should be emulated, but are instead too often ignored, by “mainstream” U.S. media!

#1

John,

I have heard that the drawback to wind power is that birds are victims of the wind power utlities. Is this the case? and, what is being done to alleviate the situation?

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