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July 28, 2009
Dozens in Nigeria killed in deadly militant violence

Nigeria, an important oil-producing nation in Africa, has been dealing with a deadly insurgency in its largely Muslim north for years, but a recent wave of violence has — by some reports — left at least a hundred people dead.

Militants say they want to impose a Taliban-like regime and oppose Western-style education. They have been attacking police stations in recent days, sparking clashes.

Marie Pace, a program officer with the Center for Mediation and Conflict Resolution at the United States Institute of Peace, joins Martin Savidge to discuss the implications of the violence and unrest.

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2 comments

#2

The Nigerian situation is likened to an incurable blight in the scale of AIDS. The Nigerian government policy of ‘unprincipled lying’, and I expect every right thinking person to be immune to it. Horam’s killing is legally unacceptable and the world should not close its eyes to such extra judicial acts of a supposedly democratic government. Today it is the northen region, yesterday it was another calculated attempt to inflict another round of programmed suicide on the niger deltans,by initiating a bill to remove to only Federal Government institution in Warri, The petroleum training institute to Kaduna in the northern region. A petroleum minister who has been in government right from Independence has lost touch with what governance is all about, and now coniving to unleash his venom on the people of an already troubled region. Sectarian crises have taken the north backward many years which is as a result of poverty. When people are poor, you can easily manipulate them for a loaf of bread.

Religion is not primordally the Nigerian case, and we should not deceive ourselves by way of subverting attention by thrusting religion in a spoiler parlance. Peace and stability has never been an issue with our leaders. Why do you think the governors from the oil regions are saying a big NO to the white washed amnesty of the federal government?

#1

The Nigerian situation is likened to an incurable blight in the scale of AIDS. The Nigerian government policy of ‘unprincipled lying’. Horam’s killing is legally unacceptable and the world should not close its eyes to such extra judicial acts of a supposedly democratic government. Today it is the northen region, yesterday it was another calculated attempt to inflict another round of programmed suicide on the niger deltans, trying to remove to only Federal Government institution in Warri, The petroleum training institute to Kaduna in the northern region. A petroleum minister who has been in government right from Independence has lost touch with what governance is all about, and now coniving to unleash his venom on the people of an already troubled region. Sectarian crises have taken the north back backward many years which is as a result of poverty. When people are poor, you cabn easily manipulate them for a loaf of bread.

Religion is not primordally the Nigerian case, and we should not deceive ourselves by way of subverting attention by thrusting religion in a spoiler parlance. Peace and stability has never been an issue with our leaders. Why do you think the governors from the oil regions are saying a big NO to the white washed amnesty of the federal government?

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