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Pivotal Power

July 13, 2009
Better than expected from the G-8

Despite all the chaos (see my previous post), the G-8 summit in Italy ended up producing more deliverables than I thought. I made this point on CNBC on Friday to an unimpressed anchor:

The G-8 pledged $20 billion for food and farming aid. They came out with a strong statement on Iran which even Russia signed onto. And the G-8 agreed to cut their emissions by 80 percent by 2050 (although the developing economies did not go along with a set goal).

Another interesting development is that the G-8 tried to address its accountability problem. It issued its first report, prepared by experts, that tracked progress compared to pledges at the last summit. Food aid was quite behind schedule (except for you, Canada — kudos), as you can see comparing these two charts in the report:


I hope they do better on this year’s pledges.

Building in accountability mechanism is key for whatever G group emerges over the next year. This was a welcome start.

– Nina Hachigian

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Comments

4 comments

#4

Adjustment(s) To The Previous Text (#1):

“listening to… listening, that is: for a possible inherent vocal geometry of [Interlinear] Thought”

And, by “vocal geometry”…(is meant:)
either of these 2 definitions:

1. Configuration

and/or…

2. Arrangement (such as is often found
in Music…especially when “Couterpoint” is
understood.)

And by “Counterpoint”…
any of the following
Definitions may be tried
and applied (as applicable)
according to their suitability (-ies):

–noun
1. Music. the art of combining melodies.
2. Music. the texture resulting from the combining of individual melodic lines.
3. a melody composed to be combined with another melody.
4. Also called counterpoint rhythm. Prosody. syncopation (def. 2).
5. any element that is juxtaposed and contrasted with another.

–verb (used with object) 6. to emphasize or clarify by contrast or juxtaposition.

#3

Adjustment(s) To The Previous Text (#1):

“If an Interviewer cannot wait for an Answer without interrupting, why then (continually) be bothering to ask Questions for which he, himself, appears to have and/or has no or very little interest in, actually, listening to… listening, that is: for a possible inherent vocal geometry
of Thought”

#2

Adjustment(s) To The Previous Text (#1):

“while the Interviewee is in process of speaking and is attempting to utter something of Potential Substance while the Interviewer is all the while, merely poorly, [engaged in] translating the Interviewee’s comments with a Language”

#1

One thing is certain:

Nina Hachigian is a very patient Woman especially with her Interviewers.
Why do I think I know this?
Once before have I seen
what I beheld again
in this video posted here.

If China goes too “dam” far, so do these Interviewers who go too damn far in their
Endless Interruptions which do barely allow
the Interviewee to get in half a sentence fully edgewise before being interrupted again with the Interviewer’s own interpretations of his personal thoughts concerning his next questions even while the Interviewee is in process of speaking and is attempting to utter something of Potential Substance while the Interviewer is all while merely poorly translating the Interviewee’s comments with a Language derived from the inner regions of his own already made-up Mindset.

If an Interviewer cannot wait for an Answer without interrupting, why then (continually) be bothering to ask Questions for which he, himself, appears to have and/or has no or very little interest in, actually, listening… listening, that is: for a possible inherent vocal geometry of Thought upon whose Structure the points and lines are Words and Ideas which may eventually provide for future profound subject matter to be rendered into pertinently valid and/or insightfully valuable Answers??

Nina Hachigian is a senior fellow at the Center for American Progress and the co-author of “The Next American Century: How the U.S. Can Thrive as Other Powers Rise.” She has worked on the staff of the National Security Council in the White House and been a senior political scientist at the RAND Corporation. She specializes in U.S.-China relations and great power relationships, multilateral institutions and U.S. foreign policy.

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