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July 10, 2009
What is statelessness?

This summer, Worldfocus.org’s multimedia project “Stateless to Statehood” explores the relationships between individuals and the states they live in. The project weaves in experiences among individuals, groups and governing states. Common themes the project has identified include racism, discrimination, ethnic identity, patriotism and nationalism.

Statelessness could mean you are trapped in the country you were born — with no birth certificate, no passport and no right to vote. You many not be able to own land ownership, access to health care and legal employment. Twelve to 15 million people live in limbo without the benefits of nationality.

Below is an audio slideshow with excerpts from our online radio show on statelessness with Dawn Calabia of Refugees International and journalist Bill Berkeley.

The feature explains statelessness with photos of the following stateless groups: Palestinians at the Iraq-Syria border, the Bidoon in Kuwait, the Rohingyas in Bangladesh, the Haitians in the Dominican Republic and the Eritreans in Ethiopia.

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Comments

2 comments

#2

Do we be really so sure of ourselfs as to the question that this be the case despite the quality of opinions as be here so expressed??

#1

Honestly speaking we are all stateless, because we identify ourselves with our little boxes of national/geo-sentiment.

In reality we are all citizens of a single geography, i.e., we are all citizens of the would (tempted to use the bigger word, ‘cosmos’). Until we learn that humanity is one, we will be condemned to little boxes and our little anti-social conduct that results untold deaths and misery.

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