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July 6, 2009
Scores killed in China in violent ethnic clashes

In China’s autonomous province of Xinjiang, more than 150 people have been reported killed and more than 800 injured in violent clashes between the ethnic Muslim Uighur population and the Han Chinese.

The rioting that started in the provincial capital of Urumqi spread to the town of Kashgar and is now being called some of the worst ethnic violence in China in decades.

Andrew James Nathan, a political science professor at Columbia University, joins Martin Savidge to discuss who the Chinese Uighurs are and what the riots may mean.

Ask your questions on Uyghur unrest for our online radio show on Tuesday, July 7.

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Comments

16 comments

#16

this video confuses me

#15

the ethnic clash is very terrible ,I hope everyone can keep calm , or the broodbath will happen !

#14

There were once a thriving Uyghur empire at the Altal Mountains where Russia is now. The empire ended around 840 AD. The Uyghurs spread throughout central asia, Mongolia and in the Chinese territories living among other nomadic tribes and were ruled by China ever since but for 2 breaks. The first was during the fall of the Mings and were ruled by the Manchus and the 2nd was during the fall of the Manchu and the subsequent civil war. In 1949 PRC reassert its sovereignty over Xinjiang from the rebels.

#13

[…] Andrew James Nathan is a political science professor at Columbia University. His teaching and research interests include Chinese politics, foreign policy, and human rights. His books include Constructing Human Rights in the Age of Globalization and How East Asians View Democracy. Watch the Worldfocus’ television interview with Prof. Nathan: Scores killed in China in violent ethnic clashes. […]

#12

[…] For more, watch the Worldfocus interview: Scores killed in China in violent ethnic clashes. […]

#11

[…] Andrew James Nathan is a political science professor at Columbia University. His teaching and research interests include Chinese politics, foreign policy, and human rights. His books include Constructing Human Rights in the Age of Globalization and How East Asians View Democracy. Watch the Worldfocus’ television interview with Prof. Nathan: Scores killed in China in violent ethnic clashes. […]

#10

[…] 6, 2009 Q&A: Ask your questions on Uighur unrest in China Scores killed in China in violent ethnic clashesMeat cleavers and steel poles arm China’s ethnic factionsPacific island set to accept […]

#9

Daniel Quinn summarized the essence of western civilization in his book: the white people exterminate their competition. It seem have worked so far.

#8

Behind all the strife, cruelty and mistrust within humanity, there is misguided intellect. That is, intellect is not moving on the right path – it is not connected to the collective welfare. Until changes are effected in the human mind, no permanent world solution is possible.

China nationalism will not cut it. They must care about all the ethinc peoples in the border regions with the same zeal that the care for their own mothers. Then there will be some sanity and morality in the national policy.

#7

Only evil minds welcome or get excited with riots. whoever and wherever they are, rioters that kill indiscrimately are wrong and should not be condoned with any made up excuse.

#6

White men’s extermination methods are more scientific. After exterminating 99% of the minorities, then you offer some form of apology. You can even get Nicole Kidman to shoot some good video, showing some romantic imagery, where a pretty white woman cared about a mixed native. But the deed is done, the trouble is eliminated. I wonder what Prof. Nathan’s view on this. There are 1.2 billion Han Chinese, they can easily wipe out the Uyghurs…

#5

Like Australia where aborigines were forcefully taken from their parents to decimate their kinds. 50 years later the Chinese will apologise for bringing in economic reform and womens rights , education for girls and giving them a quota to help them to get a place in universities. the world can wait 50 years later for a Kevin Rudd to apologise. Chinese are still waiting for an apology from the British royal family for forcing opium to the Chinese

#4

The failure of China’s racial policy is giving preferential treatment of minorities. The United States solved the native problems by systematic extermination. Therefore, you don’t see riots in U.S. The native Americans have been 99% exterminated by the white people. The Chinese took the opposite approach, controlling Han birth rates in the region while allowing Uyghurs to reproduce without restrictions. But such policies cannot win the heart of the Uyghurs, instead, they were emboldened into thinking that they can kill Han Chinese with impunity.

#3

Prof. Andrew James Nathan should read a book or Wikipedia and educate himself on who the Uyghurs are first. Get your history straight… The Uyghurs are not natives of Xinjiang. They are not Turkish people as you believed, though their language is in the Turkic family. They originally lived in Mongolia. The Han Chinese colonized Xinjiang long before there were any Uyghurs in that region.

#2

I view your nightly World Focus with great interest. I continue to watch for bias reporting. Thus far I have found none. You are to be congratulated. Keep up the good work. If I see any political bias either way, right or left. I discontinue my interest in World Focus. I feel our main stream media has let me down with their bias reporting. I enjoy your format. Keep up the good work. rew

#1

It was sparked by the violence between Uighur workers and Han workers in a factory of Guangdong province a week ago. It is an outcry of a socially vulnerable and economically disadvantaged group in China. Given the pattern of behavior we have seen here, marching while destroying in certain spots of the city of Urumqi, I think the mob was at least incited by a group of people.

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