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February 25, 2009
Class divisions widen in racially free South Africa

Worldfocus correspondent Martin Seemungal takes a look at South Africa’s easing of racial tensions in the Signature Story “Poverty preserves racial lines in post-apartheid South Africa.” Despite legal racial equality, social and economic structures continue to enforce a wide poverty gap in the country.

Dr. Xolela Mangcu of the Platform for Public Deliberation and the Social Cohesion and Identity Research Programme discusses this divide and the failure of a liberated people to meet the demands of the Mandela promise.

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3 comments

#3

At is amazing that 10 years on and all we have managed to do is replace one racial society with another, as Dr. Xolela Mangcu mentions we now have Affirmative Action which he seem to support and this Government enforced policy makes White South African males un-employable. Then he goes on to brag that he is a member of the “elitist group” whose aim it seems is to further line their pockets with tax-payers money whilst the majority of South African black people still live in poverty. What went wrong so badly that Mandelas promises of a “better South Africa” FOR ALL went out of the window. We now have a government of people who keep blaming the “whites” for everything that went or still goes wrong whilst they have the power to change it.

#2

South Africa is not racially free, it’s a dumb description.

#1

I think that it is natural for class divisions to widen in Free South Africa, because one group always feels superior or entitled over another group. It cannot be stopped – it can only be lessened by education and improved living conditions, increased buying capacity, etc. One group is bound to exploit the other. The worker is on the bottom, followed by the policeman/military types, the intellectuals and the businessmen.

In India the highest class or caste is called the Brahmin. There is a feeling of superiority of one class over another. They do not think, for example, we Homo sapiens are evolved from previous classes of animals – so the Brahmin caste comes from the Monkey caste, as does the lowest “untouchable” caste. Both Brahmin and Untouchable are brother and sister. This type of unity attitude is discouraged at every level of society.

This whole system of class distinction seems to be a mental disease. Thus far, we “Homo sapiens” have not found a cure for this mental disease. We have made a great leap forward in intellectual and intuitive development, but maybe not far enough to overcome our baser animal behavior. I hope these continuing problems of class divisions lead us to solutions that make everyone’s “class” a bit more bearable.

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