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Perspectives

December 9, 2008
Webcast: Panel on Kashmir — listen now

Worldfocus.org presents a live webcasted radio show on Kashmir with the help of BlogTalkRadio.

The disputed region of Kashmir — a source of tension between India and Pakistan — has seen renewed attention following the attacks on Mumbai. But often the interests of India and Pakistan dominate the discussion of Kashmir.

Worldfocus’ radio show discusses the Kashmiri people, their history and the human rights situation in Kashmir.

Worldfocus anchor Martin Savidge has reported from Kashmir and hosts a panel featuring a range of voices and perspectives on Kashmir:

Mohsin Mohi-Ud Din is a Kashmiri-American who is involved in humanitarian efforts in Kashmir, working independently with the Kashmir People’s Tribunal. Mohsin is a Fulbright scholar to Morocco and the drummer of a Kashmiri rock band Zerobridge. He blogs at the Huffington Post. He currently works for the international Human Rights NGO, Human Rights First.

Haley Duschinski is a cultural anthropologist at Ohio University who travels to Kashmir annually. Her research focuses on violence and war, human rights and transitional justice in Kashmir within the context of the ongoing peace process between India and Pakistan. She answered questions about Kashmir from Worldfocus viewers here.

Azmat Hassan is a career diplomat of 33 years standing and former ambassador of Pakistan, where his postings have included Ambassador of Pakistan to Malaysia, Syria and Morocco, and Deputy Permanent Representative of Pakistan to the United Nations in New York. He is currently on the faculty at Whitehead School of Diplomacy.

Chitralekha Zutshi is a professor of history at the College of William and Mary. She is the author of the book, “Languages of Belonging: Islam, Regional Identity and the Making of Kashmir.” She is currently exploring how Kashmiris see their own past.

Credits:
Host: Martin Savidge
Producers: Lisa Biagiotti, Katie Combs and Stephen Puschel

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Comments

11 comments

#11

A very basic discussion on Kashmir, probably introducing the rudimentary issues to the World that would find the layers the tragedy difficult to comprehend. Lived experience shows that disempowering and dispossession operates much more subtly and astutely… The motivation to keep the suffering going on over such long durations of time… despite all the stated goodwill, emenates from darker aspirations and desires (mostly collective and concealed)… Kashmir tragedy is not just a product of errors made by chance… but by will. I think, why Kashmir happens to inspire such passion for so many people may have little to do with Kashmir itself (I find exoticisation of Kashmir banefully ridiculous!) but with the deeper selves of those involved. It is only by coming to terms with these hidden aspects of our collective personalty… that are little understood, having never become part of our intellectual discussions… that Kashmir crisis may be understood.

#10

i heard the podcast. thebetter part or the best part was a question by another fulbrite scolar to the young kasmiri on program and also the kasmiri hindu driven from his home by etinic cleansing. the young panel memmber mentions the peoples march by thousands recently. i can bet you if tomorrow you can have millions of peaceful demonstrations all over india if india wants to show that india should never let go kashmir.kashmiri muslims are also various differnt groups as mentioned by the first questenair..the panel member really didnot answer the quetion of killings of hindus but again said so many kashmiris died.the ambasodor says that pakistan itself is a victim of terror and so he justifies a terrosit can “invade” so to say from one country(namely pakistan) to another country(namely india) secreatary of stat rice was very forceful and clear that if perpatoratos of terrorism from on country is the responsibilityof state from which they come.i think the pakistan military establishment wants to go at india (itching sotosay) spring some militaty sucess and and declare victory and ceasefire. they also want to use their nuclear bomb at the earliest fighting (if it starts)kill millions of indians.hope it doesnot happen

#9

DEAR Mr.SAVIDGE
TWO DAYS AGO YOU INTERVIEWED AN AMBASSADOR FROM PAKISTAN ON “WORLD FOCUS” , HIS REMARKS WERE THAT MUSLIMS IN INDIA ARE TREATED AS “SECOND CLASS CITIZENS”. THIS INFORMATION IS AS INCORRECT AS SAYING THAT THE TERRORISTS IN BOMBAY ATTACKS WERE NOT HELPED BY AN ORGANISATION FROM PAKISTAN.
THE WHOLE WORLD KNOWS THAT, IF NOT HERE ARE A FEW EXAMPLES:
1.THE LAW IN INDIA FOR MARRIAGE IS NO MORE THAN ONE WIFE FOR A MALE EXCEPT MUSLIMS IN NO OTHER NON-ISLAMIC COUNTRY THAT IS TRUE.
2.THE FIRST CABINET OF Mr.JAWAHAR LAL NEHRU HAD THREE MUSLIMS IN THE CABINET (ALL OF THOSE WERE EXCELLENT CHOICES AND EXCELLENT HUMAN BEINGS),MAULANA ABDUL KALAM AZAD, RAFI AHMED KHIDWAI & I’VE FORGOTTEN THE THIRD NAME,I AM SORRY FOR THAT.
3.WE HAVE HAD I THINK THREE MUSLIMS WHO WERE PRESINDENTS OF INDIA, THE LATEST ONE WHO HAS BEEN REPLACED BY HON.LADY PRATIBHA PATIL , HON.ABDUL KALAM (I CALL THIS WONDERFUL HUMAN BEING THE “WERNER VON BRAUN OF INDIA”.
4.IN THE PAST, PRESENT & FUTURE THERE WILL BE MANY DESERVING MUSLIMS WHO WILL OCCUPY HONORABLE POSITION IN THE FUTURE OF INDIA.
5.TAKE OUR CRICKET TEAMS THERE HAVE BEEN MUSLIM CAPTAINS,PARSI CAPTAINS , CHRISTIAN CAPTAINS AND HINDU CAPTAINS NO ONE COMMUNITY HAS ENJOYED A MONOPOLY.
6.LAST BUT NOT THE LEAST AS I SAW ON TV DURING THESE COWARDLY ATTACKS ON BOMBAY’S INNOCENT PEOPLE THE POLICE COMMISSWIONER IS A MUSLIM.
LET ME KNOW WHICH MUSLIM COUNTRY CAN BOAST OF THIS COSMOPOLITAN ATTITUDE AS BY THE PEOPLE OF INDIA?
IF NSPITE OF ALL THIS THE HON.AMBASADOR THINKS THAT THE MUSLIMS ARE TREATED AS SECOND CLASS CITIZENS THEN ALL I HAVE TO SAY HAS ANYONE TIED THEM DOWN TO INDIA OR FORCED THEM TO STAY IN INDIA?THEY ARE FREE TO LEAVE INDIA IF THEY SO DESIRE. INDIA IS A DEMOCRATIC COUNTRY AND PEOPLE ARE FREE TO GO AND LIVE WHERE THEY SO DESIRE.
THANKS AND JAI HIND,
MOTI

#8

I love how you guys add another element to your broadcast by putting the podcast behind it. Very well done.

#7

It was good to see a diverse group of people being able to express their opinion on the Kashmir issue however thats what always gets me a bit frustrated is that everytime somthing major happens like a catastrophe or sth it draws the attention to the problem that always existed….Pakistan and India have always been fighting over Kashmir and only now after the Mumbai attacks this is drawing attention again…i just hope this gets resolved. Its high time because territorial/ political disengagements really wastes alot of energy/ time esp since ive come here and interacted with so many Indians and have realized that we have so much in common and its a shame how the political agendas of both keep us so disengaged.

#6

Let us understand the following basic facts about Kashmir:
The dispute between India and Pakistan is over the State of Jammu and Kashmir.
The area of this State that are under Indian control includes three regions: Jammu (predominantly Hindu); Kashmir (predominantly Moslems) and Ladakh (predominantly Buddhists).
The areas under Pakistani control inclues Gilgit, Northern areas and Pakistani controlled Kashmir (Azad Kashmir).
Geographically Kashmir valley is just a very small area within the State of Jammu and Kashmir.
India approached the UN in 1948 after Pakistani army and tribal people invaded the State.
The UN Security Council resolution directed Pakistan to remove its forces and citizens from the State which will be followed by reduction of forces by India and a referendum which will decide whether people in the State want to join India or Pakistan.
Pakistan never fulfiled its obligation and over the past 60 years the demographics of the State have changed. This was primarily through selective killings of non-Moslems in Kashmir valley after 1989 which forced almost 95% of the ethnic Kashmiri Hindus to flee their place of birth and live as refugees in camps outside Kashmir valley.
Prior to 1989, Kashmir and Kashmiris were very peace-loving but everything changed in 1989 when terrorists, trained and armed by Pakistan
started the killings.
According to numerous polls and surveys conducted in the State of Jammu & Kashmir by many International survey groups like the MORI, people in Ladakh region want to be part of India and so do people in Jammu region. A small percentage of people (primarily in Kashmir valley), who are predominantly moslem, more so after ethnically cleansing Kashmiri Hindus from the valley, cannot hold the entire populations of the State of Jammu & Kashmir and the Countries of India and Pakistan hostage. If this minority wants to join Pakistan – let their leadership renounce violence and lead a non-violence movement like the Tibetans or the Baluchis.

#5

Kashmiri Hindus were forced to leave Kashmir valley only because they did not belong to majority Muslim religion. Imagine if this could happen to any community that is a majority ruling community. This is the price that Kashmiri Hindus have paid due to the appeasement policies of GOI. They are still blinded with their failed pseudo-secular policies and the results are evident. See the condition of Kashmiri Hindu Refugee camps in Jammu in Shehjar Magazine at: http://www.shehjar.kashmirgroup.com/viewArticle.do?method=magazineissuearticlepages&maga_arti_id=480&page_no=1&PAGE_ID=1&mag_issue_id=0

#4

As a native Kashmiri raised in Kashmir and now living in the Unted States, I often find Kashmir issue highly misrepresented and distorted. The fact reamins that Pakistan is the only entity that has no legal or moral standing on Kashmir. It has untiringly nurtured terrorists and fundamentalists turning Kashmir into a virtual grave yard. The present chaos can be directly traced to creation of Maddrassas funded by Saudi Arabia that started cropping up after the liberation of Bangladesh. We were mute witness to state government turning blind eye to an emergiong threat. World attention must be refocussed on Pakistan (and its sopporter China). Pakistan is a real global threat and there shall be no peace anywhere let alone Kashmir till this threat is deftly handled.

#3

Very interesting webcast, and very happy to see you using emerging technologies. I covered the Kashmir earthquake when the Canadian Military was sent to help with the relief effort and the haunting beauty of the mountains has never left me. http://chrisdick.squarespace.com/pakistan-series/
I applaud your efforts to broaden the scope of the discussion.

C. Dick

#2

Thank you for the enlighting show. After listing to the webcast, it is clearly evident that the most pressing issue is to “bring democracy, normalcy, peace and prosperity to the Kashmir people”. Every attempt to bring economical prosperity to the region has been dealt with militancy.

This militancy is a direct result of funding and support by Pakistan. 3 wars have been started by Pakistan in an attempt to induce insurgency in the region. Pakistan seems to have pioneered the model of military coupes to bring down democratic government. Pakistan wants to apply this model (their most successful) to Kashmir. I hope someday Pakistan starts to behave sensibly.

As far as operations of Indian troops are concerned, they should be held accountable to the rule of law. Indian constitution will not tolerate abuse of powers by any government personnel. We should make efforts to enforce the law and bring justice to the oppressed and this needs to be achieved in a democratic manner.

#1

[…] The disputed region of Kashmir — a source of tension between rivals India and Pakistan — has seen renewed attention following the attacks on Mumbai. But often the interests of India and Pakistan dominate the discussion of Kashmir. Worldfocus’ discussion will center on the Kashmiri people, their history and the human rights situation in Kashmir. Users can listen, or join a live chat and submit questions online (via BlogTalkRadio). Read more… […]

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